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Yemenis Honor Victims of War in Rally against the Saudi-led Aggression

Yemenis Honor Victims of War in Rally against the Saudi-led Aggression
folder_openYemen access_time4 months ago
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By Staff, Agencies

Hundreds of Yemenis took to the streets in the northern city of Saada, voicing anger at Saudi Arabia’s ongoing military aggression against their country and commemorating those killed in the seven-year-old war.

The mass rally, dubbed “Loyalty to the Blood of Martyrs” was held on Thursday, with demonstrators chanting slogans against Riyadh and demanding justice for the victims of the Saudi-led military campaign as they marched in the city.

The protesters also condemned the United States and some other Western and regional countries for supporting Saudi Arabia in the war on Yemen.

The latest development comes as Saudi Arabia has recently stepped up its airstrikes, killing more Yemenis and causing more destruction.

Earlier in the day, Saudi warplanes carried out fresh airstrikes on Sanaa, bombarding the Sabeen residential area at least three times in a few minutes.

The houses of Yemeni citizens had been damaged in Sanaa during the Saudi air raids, contrary to the coalition’s claim of targeting a military camp, according to a report by Yemen’s al-Masirah network.

On Monday, the Saudi-led collation also targeted Sanaa Airport, which remains a lifeline for Yemenis.

Saudi Arabia launched the devastating military aggression against its southern neighbor in March 2015 in collaboration with a number of its allied states and with arms and logistics support from the US and several Western states.

The aim was to return to power the former Riyadh-backed regime and crush the popular Ansarullah movement which has been running state affairs in the absence of an effective government in Yemen.

The war, accompanied by a tight siege, has failed to reach its goals, but it has killed hundreds of thousands of Yemeni people and has turned entire Yemen into the scene of the world’s worst humanitarian crisis.

The United Nations says more than 24 million Yemenis are in dire need of humanitarian aid, including 10 million suffering from extreme levels of hunger.

The Saudi war has also taken a heavy toll on the country’s infrastructure, destroying hospitals, schools, and factories.

Despite heavily-armed Saudi Arabia’s incessant bombardment of the impoverished country, the Yemeni armed forces and the Popular Committees have grown steadily in strength against the Saudi-led invaders and left Riyadh and its allies bogged down in the country.

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