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Algeria Dances on the Edge of Abyss: Bouteflika’s Retreat and The No Solution

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By Touba Arar

Beirut – The battle hasn’t ended yet and Algeria remains dancing on the edge of political abyss. Despite the fact that Algeria’s President Abdelaziz Bouteflika announced that he doesn’t seek a 5th term, the situation in the country is worse than ever, opening the door to uncertainties on all levels.

Al-Ahed news contacted an informed source who stated that the current situation in Algeria is extremely paradoxical.

On the one hand, the regime is trying to tighten its grip to avoid divisions in its body. On the other hand, the opposition could not unify its position.

According to the source, “The large numbers of Algerians who have demonstrated, have affected both sides: the regime and the opposition that has tried to appear as unified. However, this is far from reality.”

“The regime took a step towards getting closer to protesters, as it said, by declaring major reforms to the composition of the government and postponing the presidential election. But this has not been favorably seen by the opposition, because it means that Bouteflika will remain in office until an unknown date,” he added.

Regarding the possible duration of the protests and the horizon for getting out of the crisis, the source said that the regime should pursue reform measures by forming a founding conference that will elect its own president and that will specify the way out the current period.

In parallel, the source warned that a martial law might be a development in case of Algeria witnessed an increase in protests and in absence of a solution that would be agreed on with the opposition.

While French President Emmanuel Macron called for "a transition of a reasonable duration", a question is raided: Who is the person supposed to lead this period?

“Taking into consideration the difficulties within the regime and its successive attempts to allow itself to take the initiative for the leadership of a period of transition to the Second Republic, the current opposition may have been able to bring together people in the streets, but could not reach a united position,” the source lamented.

As the answers to questions remain unclear, it remains vague how the revolutionary country would emerge unharmed from the current crisis.

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